Posts tagged with "animal behavior"

3 Steps to Peaceful Living in Multi-Pet Homes

Hi everyone!

If there is one thing for sure about animal lover’s, it’s that cats (or insert animal species of your choice here______) are like potato chips, you can’t have just one!

Invariably this can cause some tension now and then between animals within a household, and even between one animal and several people in a household.

We have boiled it down to two things the people need, and three things the animals need, to help minimize the stress, and help everyone stay younger, longer!

For the people it’s really just two things:

  1. The willingness to believe that animals are  trying to tell you something, and you are trying to understand what it is,

and

  1. The willingness to put ego aside and really listen and respond to what they are ‘saying’, even if it we don’t really like what it is! Allow them to have their own opinion, so to say.

That’s it! That is all you have to do! Not that hard, right?

 

Now for the animals, they need three things:

  1. Enough space, including a bed, of their very own. Make sure each animal has enough space relative to its species (a rat needs a big enclosure but a dog needs an even bigger one!).  Animals need a safe space they can feel safe in and call their own.  How many beds? Always aim for at least one more than animals, so they can have a choice of where to spend their time.
  2. A secure, feeding place and dish of their own. No one wants to feel like they have to share if they don’t want to. Each animal in the family is entitled to their own food dish, and to be safe and secure while eating meals so they can’t be bullied by anyone else during meal times.
  3. Play time! This is your daily bonding time! Take a moment to look them over from top to bottom each day (grooming too is even better), have some loving eye contact, and get a little exercise. Even if it’s only for a minute, this is the reason why we have animals in the first place. So take time to enjoy them each day. Exercise helps keep them, and us, young!

For more in depth on this, check out my LIVE broadcast above.

Thanks so much for tuning in! On that note, I’m DrQ, here to help you both, stay younger, longer. If you find this helpful, please like, follow, and share on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. AND have a great day! 🙂

 

Free Positive Pet Advice on Facebook!

Do you ever notice how pets seem to start acting strangely, or come up with new unwanted behaviors, right after most business office hours? How many times has that happened to you? Many times that is when we make a quick visit to  Google to see what the world has to say about what might be happening with your pet. The GREAT news is, we do have the internet! Although people often make negative remarks about it, with a little common sense and due diligence, it’s not usually too difficult to figure out what makes good sense, versus that which is a bunch of malarkey, or just people trying to sound bigger and more important than they are. (Aren’t you glad you don’t walk in that guy’s shoes).

Just as most veterinarians,  I can’t always answer every message on Facebook or text at certain times such as,  the middle of a surgery, or during a behavior consultation.  This leaves people looking for answers needing  to contact an emergency hospital, or surf the internet and hope to find good information. For real medical emergencies it is still best to get to the nearest after hours emergency vet right away. However for good, quick answers to behavior, training, and basic health care questions, a really great group on Facebook, one that I have come to know and love, is called  Positive Pet Advice. PPA

Positive Pet Advice was created October 12, 2014, by Louis Walton, a dog professional who was tired of the same old dog training groups where people spent as much time talking about their credentials, than they did actually trying to use their experience and knowledge to help others looking for answers. Young people today don’t go to the library anymore to research the answers, they go on the internet and hope to find the same information. This is mostly a blessing, since now we have more good information available faster than ever before. However, as with all things, sometimes you get what you pay for, and free advice must always be taken with a dose of caution.

However, armed with that knowledge, pet groups on Facebook, Instagram, and other social media sites do often have some knowledgeable people participating when they can, so when the work is split up among a group, you often can get nearly 24 hour 7 day a week free advice which more often than not is likely to be of some use to you, and fairly accurate. Getting that advice from a group such as Positive Pet Advice is even better, since most of the time the comments are very helpful, and monitored fairly closely by the administrators of the site to ensure it sounds reasonable, and just as importantly, polite. Thus the name POSITIVE Pet Advice.   Some groups on the internet criticize others for asking questions some might feel is treating an animal ‘wrong’ or ‘bad”. In this group that sort of criticism is not allowed, however, discussions are encouraged which center around certain standards of care, and training methods, as a means to educate and enlighten those interested and willing.

Speaking of the admin, or administrators of the site, they are lovely group of dog trainers and animal behaviorists, some even having experience with zoo animals, and highly recognized speakers in their fields.  Not to mention they are all a selfless bunch of people who donate hours of their time every single day, week after week,  to make sure the group runs smoothly, provides members with helpful pet information, and without a single thought of compensation, only because they know it is the right to do. Now often do you find that in the world anymore?

So, if you find yourself searching on line for some sort of health, behavior, or training advice, and it is NOT a medical emergency, then I encourage you to ask to join the closed group Positive Pet Advice on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/767055476662599/.  I have been working remotely with this group for over a year, and it is one of the most rewarding part of my work week. It is so encouraging to work hand in hand with such a talented group of animals experts in their respective fields, who give so freely of themselves, really just for the sake of helping the animals and their people. They do great live videos, give gifts to members, and other fun things, too!

Just to be clear, for any medical emergency or serious health concerns, please contact your nearest veterinarian as soon as possible. If you are just wondering about a product, a practice, or fun ways to make new toys or games for your animals, then Positive Pet Advice is a safe, welcome place, I recommend and support, to all my clients and friends.

On that note, I am DrQ, here to help you, and your animals live happier and healthier, longer. If you are on Facebook, like Dr. Q and join Positive Pet Advice! Thanks for reading!

Betta Fish 101!

You see him from across the room, all bright colors and radiant personality, virtually calling out to you “Hey you, come over here! Check me out! Am I not the most handsome thing you have seen all day? You know you want me baby…!

So who is this alluring creature that has captivated your heart and mind? It’s the magnificent betta fish! First things first, his name is “bet”-“tah” fish, not “bay”-“ta”. You don’t want to hurt his macho pride, do you? Well actually that’s just part of the story. His (or her) real name is Siamese Fighting Fish, or to be more specific (and accurate)  Betta Splendens.

The picture of health!

The picture of health!

They come from Asia, specifically the tropical waters of Thailand (formally Siam). The natural habitat of this fish is the shallow streams and rice paddies of Vietnam and Thailand. These huge, shallow areas of wetland are where they carouse around rivers skimming insects, larvae and insect eggs off the surface of the water with their upturned mouths, and doing so wearing much less dramatic colors. Males are relatively territorial and will defend their own space from other fish, especially those who also have colorful, flowing fins. They love to hide, rest and play in the abundant foliage found in their natural habitat.

Around the 19th century people from Malaysia and Thailand began to collect these fish from the wild. They were kept for both bright color patterns and long flowing fins, as well as aggression. This developed in conjunction with staged fish fighting matches, apparently enjoyed by the King of Siam in 1840. In the wild these fish only spar for a few minutes, however in captivity they were bred for a willingness to continue fighting. Once a fish retreats, the match would be considered over. Luckily not a fight to the death!

One of the most fascinating facts about this unique fish is that it has a labyrinth organ, a defining characteristic of fish in the suborder Anabantoidei, which the betta belongs to,  which allows it to actually obtain oxygen from the air above the surface of the water,  instead of taking it from the water through their gills.  The labyrinth organ helps the inhaled oxygen to be absorbed into the bloodstream, and develops from  expansion of a bone in the first gill arch.  As a result, like all labyrinth fish, they can survive for a short period of time out of water, provided they stay moist. For a betta fish to stay healthy, it is critically important  for them to periodically get some exercise as well as use their labyrinth organ to obtain air. Betta fry (babies) are 100% dependent on getting air through their gills, until their labyrinth organ fully develops at around 3-6 weeks of age.

Healthy gorgeous betta fish!

Healthy gorgeous betta fish!

So now we  have a purpose bred beautiful and aggressive, beloved aquarium fish with an air breathing super power and one heck of a personalty!  Actually they all have different personalities, some more peaceful than others, which is what makes putting them in a tank with other fish, let’s just say, interesting! Read on for more about that!

Other fascinating facts about them include,  that the males blow bubble nests which they use to carefully tend and raise the eggs (after the female that  deposited them, has been chased off, since she will most likely eat them),  that they like to sleep in hammocks,  they can be taught tricks, that they come in an amazing variety of more than 9 color patterns,  and at least 14 different fin and scale patterns (like crown tail, double tail, half-moon, etc.),  that besides food and clean water they need exercise, friends, and rest (so no lights on 24 hours a day), to stay healthy.

So how long can I expect my betta to live?

An interesting survey recently showed that most bettas live about 2 years, a few to three, fewer still make it to 4, yet nearly as many that make it past 2, make it past 5. These are fascinating statistics.  This means most bettas live to either 2, or much longer, with not much in between. Knowing that most bettas are at least 6 months to a year old before you purchase them (they wait until full sexual maturity at about 4-5 months of age to begin selling them, so that you can see their fully developed fins and colors), and that most make it to an age of two, my suspicion is that the way that most people keep and care for them, is sustainable only about 12-24 months before the long term stress of mismanagement begins to take it’s toll.  Well how hard can it be to take care of a little betta fish in a bowl? The answer is, it’s not hard, it’s actually quite easy, as long as you care careful about 1 key thing:

Do not do once weekly complete water changes!

I see this one little oversight taking the lives of more betta fish than any other problem. So why is this such a big deal? Because your fish eats food, which then turns into fish poo, which is made up of ammonia, which is eaten up by all the invisible good little bacteria that live on the gravel, in the water, on the plants, and on any and all other surfaces inside the tank. If you dump out the water each week, and worse yet, rinse all the gravel, and plants, you each week are killing off the beneficial bacteria which are vital to the good health of your fish.  If you have no good bacteria, then each week your fish is exposed to toxic levels of ammonia. Even though it may only be at toxic levels for a day or two until you do that full water change, over time this continual stress takes it’s toll on your fish’s immune system.  So it’s like spending one full day a week in a crowded bar full of smokers with no windows.  Eventually you are going to develop a cough, or worse. The same thing is happening with your fish. They are amazing little creatures that can tolerate a lot and still survive, yet they do much better with slow changes in all things. Therefore don’t change all the water once a week, do a 25% water change every 2-3 days, and watch your fish thrive! And make sure that water stays around 78-80 degress F, after all, these little ones came from Asia!

Additionally, the have small stomach’s about the size of their eyeball, so feed them at least once, but more like twice a day, just enough that they eat it all in one meal (floating uneaten food is your second worst enemy to fish health besides water quality).  Here is a little video clip I did on the topic of feeding What do betta’s eat in captivity?

Also ensure they have an enriched environment, this means interesting things to explore, and mix it up regularly with plants, rocks, ornaments, ceramic tubes, floating ping pong balls, moss balls,  and other smooth objects (no clay flower pots with sharp edges/chips that can snag fragile fins). Nourishing your fish’s mind is just as important to his long term health as nourishing species specific food (never generic aquarium fish food to bettas, only food meant just for them).

Betta fish of a smoother fin variety.

Betta fish of a smoother fin variety.

So what about the size of the tank? One fish in a 5 gallon tank is a MINIMUM! Anything smaller than that is just not adequate.  Bigger is better, and much easier to take care of, to boot! And what about friends in the tank? Well would you like to be in solitary isolation your whole life? Probably not, and neither does your fish.  Even though males are solitary in the wild, they are surrounded by all manner of other species of fish. You can mimic the same by making smart choices of fish to share their space. One of the better choices are corydora (little clear/silvery fish and you need at least 6 for them to be happy), and they also prefer a Ph up to about 7. Clown pleco’s, a colorful  algae eater is another good choice. This one is smaller than some of the other pleco variety’s and will give the added bonus of eating algae in the tank too although, you will want at least  20 gallon tank for a fish of this size. Guppies are another option although sometimes the bettas will pick at them if they have flowing tails. There are reports of betta’s getting along with no problems  in other kinds of community fish tanks, as well.

Adding new fish must be done carefully, from an adequate quarantine period, to monitoring fins as some betta’s are more aggressive than others. In general the more space and interesting places to hide and explore, the less stress and everyone will have a higher chance of getting along. Of course you don’t want to have 2 male bettas, or a male and female, as both situations lead to aggression. Some people choose to keep betta’s alone in a 5 gallon or larger tank to not risk it or hassle with it at all. If you choose this then keep in mind your fish will need more maintenance and interaction to stay happy and healthy. You will want to play laser tag, and/or add the other other enrichment ideas already discussed, on a regular basis to keep your only fish child happy.

I have done everything I could, but my fish is sick anyway, now what?

Finally, so now you now most of what you need to know, yet your little fish is sick anyway. How can I be sure my fish is sick, and what do I do first? Here is a video I did based on what one client asked me Why is my betta pale and not swimming? Other ways you can tell a fish is sick is have they have worn, frayed fins, growths or abnormalities on their bodies, or they do not eat. So first things first if you suspect your fish is sick:

  1. Get a water quality test kit, and use it, daily while the fish is sick, and once a week thereafter, for as long as your fish lives. Most importantly make sure the ammonia and nitrites are zero. If they are not? Daily 25% water changes (not more) until the conditions are right. Be sure to add something to remove the chlorine from tap water, too, and it helps to add a little beneficial bacteria (available at your aquarium store).
  2. Double check the temperature and make it right, between 78-80 F.
  3. Before spending money to add chemicals and treatments recommended by someone, if your fish is still not doing well and you have done the above, your next step is to call an aquatic veterinarian! One near you can be located through these sources: World Aquatic Veterinary Medical AssociationAmerican Veterinary Medical AssociationAmerican Association of Fish Vets. If there is not one near you, then reach out to the one nearest you, who can then possibly guide your local small animal or exotic vet in the treatment and care of your sick fish.

So how long can a betta fish live? Well with proper care, enrichment, exercise, and great water quality, bettas have been know to live up to 9 years. However, if yours does not live that long, it does not mean you have necessarily done anything wrong. We often don’t really know how old the little one was before you got him or her, or what they might have been exposed to, or what their genetics were before they came to be in your care.  All we can do is arm ourselves with education, love and devotion. It’s the least we can do for them, after all the joy, smiles, and entertainment the little beings bring to us.

On that note I am DrQ, here with best wishes for your fishes! If you have tried all of this and still have a sick fish, please contact me for a consultation http://www.drkoi.com Please leave comments, share, and follow me on our favorite social media site such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Linkdin for more valuable animal care information. Thank you!

 

 

Should You Keep Your Current Vet? An acupuncture story…

Recently I had the opportunity to spend time in a veterinary practice to which I had never been before. It was fairly exciting, as  I had heard the gentleman had been in practice for many years, and was especially knowledgeable in eastern medicine as well as traditional veterinary medicine.  I was eager to have the honor to get to spend some time with someone of his magnitude, and just knew I would be able to pick up a few tips to helps my patients, too.

That is exactly what happened! He was gracious enough to give me not only a tour of his clinic, but also shared with me his best tips for how to build my own vet clinic one day, pitfalls to avoid, and even down to the best kind of drainage system in the kennels.

The best part was yet to come when I saw the vast array of herbal remedies he had on the shelves of his pharmacy, it was amazing! The antibiotics and steroid type medicines took up only a very small amount of space on the shelf, the rest was all homeopathic remedies, herbals tinctures, and acupuncture needles. I was certainly inspired to acknowledge all my previous training in holistic medicine, and resigned myself to do a better job in 2016 of recommending more natural remedies to my clients and their pets.

He had a wonderful bedside manner, the staff all seemed on-task and good at their jobs, and it was interesting to observe how they managed multiple acupuncture patients at one time.  I observed both dogs and cats getting acupuncture treatments, and noted the extra steps they took to keep the rooms quiet, and dark, during the treatments, for the animals comfort.

I love acupuncture. I do it on my patients, my kids, and myself.  I believe in it so much  I never travel without needles.  They are such a useful tool, and I can treat such a variety of issues with only one or two tiny needles, it’s great! I have treated everything from allergies, to sunburn, to arthritis, and joint pain, with great success using only acupuncture.

 

Josephina after an acupuncture treatment.

Josephina after an acupuncture treatment.

This got me think about how I do to my own acupuncture treatments, in my house call practice.  I find I only recommend it on select patients, and not because they couldn’t all benefit from it. I don’t recommend it more, because, the more I have learned over the past about the science of behavior and training, I have come to a profound realization. That is, nothing, other than life or death safety,  should cause the animals to be afraid, uncomfortable, anxious, or hurt.  They are our friends, and in many cases, family members.

As they say in kindergarten, never hurt someone on the outside, or the inside. When we force anything other than potentially life or death, painful procedures, on animals, we are holding down and hurting those we love, without thought to their opinion on the matter.  I am very cognizant of each and every interaction I have with all my animal patients. I would rather leave the home visit on a good note, and come back to do a follow up a few days later, than hold the animals down to do something that only ‘might’ help. For many it is the first time in their lives they have a stress free,  thorough physical exam with a veterinarian.  This helps me do a better job, and we all have less stress and live longer.

With acupuncture sometimes it takes a little patience. You have to build the animals trust, first. So maybe the first time we just do a little massage and laser treatment, and do the acupuncture next time. Using only the smallest of needles on the fearful or highly anxious patients. Again, nothing is worth their discomfort (unless their life is on the line). And I have found that frightened animals with high endorphin release often do not respond well to acupuncture, anyway. While the calm, trusting patience who receive it with a deep breath, often get complete and total relief of many ailments and pain in just one treatment. One, well done, treatment.

Bringing the science of using primarily positive reinforcement in each interactions we have with animals,  will soon be essential knowledge for each and every veterinarian, veterinary technician, and every other kind of animal professional (from dog trainers to zoo keepers) trained in the world today, and into the future. Understanding what positive reinforcement is, and is not, is of paramount importance for everyone who cares about the well being of any animal. The principles are all the same, and they work across species. In the world of those trained in the science of behavior it’s known as R+.

This is why I have in the past not recommend acupuncture more often to my patients. I was not sure I would be fully able to explain that mostly I just don’t want to hurt their animal or cause it anxiety towards me.  I felt over the long term life of the pet with me as their vet, better they trust me and allow good exams all the time, than learn to fear me because sometimes I hurt them. My preference is to only do acupuncture treatments, well all examinations for that matter,  on patients that will allow me to with little to no restraint, and while handling the animal as if their made of fine china. These tend to be the ones with the highest rate of success.

Yes of course sometimes I might have to hurt animals a tiny bit, such as to get a blood sample, but only to help make their lives much, much better. In that case, I do it with as much dignity and grace as possible, taking all the time it takes, to keep the procedure as stress free as humanly possible. And ask their forgiveness afterwards. I usually get luckily!  If only people were as forgiving and accommodating as most animals!

So, should you keep your current vet? Bottom line, I am not sure, you have to decide. Does the doctor and all their staff,NEW HOLISTIC VETERINARY CLINIC IN DENVER, CO. treat you, and your animal, like an individual? Do you feel like they really listen, understand you, and care? Can you talk to them about how you really feel, and use that to guide your pets care? Then you are likely at the right place!

I am DrQ, here to help you, and your pets live longer, healthier, and happier, together, than you ever thought possible!  Thanks for reading! Share if you agree!

My Dog Ate My Shoes; Now What?

You adopted an adorable puppy who was in need of a good home. The puppy has become like another member of the family, and is loved and adored by all! All of the things you love about a new pet are there, the love, the cuddles, the house training is no problem, the pup is great in the house, and likes to go everywhere with you. It is a perfect love affair, until the one day you rush out the door,  and your adorable ball of fuzz, normally perfectly well behaved in the house,  decides for some unexpected reason, to express herself by targeting and destroying some personal item of yours. In this case, maybe your personal notebook which holds many of of your important documents. Or maybe it’s your new favorite pair of shoes…

You come home,  exasperated by the finding of the shredded, difficult if not impossible to replace, item. You are understandably angry! And hurt! How could she do this to you? Why did he did this to you? “What did I do wrong?”, you ask yourself. And what do I do now? You don’t have time for this! This is what I wanted to avoid when I chose to get a dog…

You know from reading books and reading on line about dog training, that dogs need a certain amount of exercise, play time, and toys.   You have provided those, yet you still find yourself frustrated. And what about that lag time between when the action happens and you come home to find it? Do they understand why for once you are NOT happy to see them when you got home?

As the Life Coach for People with Pets, let me help you sort through the human aspect of this first, and there in you may find the answers you seek, without spending a lot more time and money.

First of all, it is OK, and natural, to be angry. Yes there are some who say, that if you don’t catch the dog IN THE ACT of destroying something (or peeing on something), they are not “smart” enough to make the association between you being angry now, and what they did perhaps hours ago.  So what are you supposed to do? Come in, see the mess, ignore it and move on? Well then how in the world can you set the odds in your favor it will never happen again?

Let me ask you this, if you came home from work one day, and your roommate who does not speak much English  had taken scissors and cut all your sheets into shreds, would you just come in, and smile and act like nothing is wrong? Of course not! And so therefore I plead the case that yes, you should ‘tell’ your dogs that you are not pleased, when you come home.

No this does not mean it is ok  to rub their nose in it, ever. No more than you would grab your roommate by the back of the neck and throw him down and rub his nose in it. Yet it is natural and normal to put your hands on your hips, look at your roommate, or your dog in this case,  look at the mess, and sadly shake your head in despair. Violence is never the answer.  Simple communication is enough.

Remember, dogs are much better readers of body language, than us.  Without the benefit of complex words to convey a precise meaning, dogs have developed a very keen sense of reading body language. Your expressions, your tone of voice, even your odor, all of these things your dog uses to intimately care about you, the most important thing in their life, the giver of toys, food, leash walks, and love. Your dog probably knows you better than anyone, especially that roommate! And dogs are not encumbered by worrying about yesterday, or tomorrow, or a few hours ago, they have forgiven and forgotten, and are ready to enjoy the next moments of life with you. Which is something we can probably all learn from a little bit.

So, the first step is be yourself! Tell your dog how you feel! By literally verbalizing WHY what they did was so hurtful to you, right now as soon as you discover the situation. No of course they don’t understand your words. But don’t clean up the mess in silent anguish. The whole time “explain” to the dog exactly what what they did was such a big deal to you.  That was my homework I worked hours on. That was my grandmother’s antique rug you pooped on. I  worked for a whole month to pay for those shoes! You are not nearly as good at interpreting  body language as dogs are, however, when we as humans ‘verbalize’ what we are feeling, we cannot help but express ourselves in our body language, and our dogs CAN understand that.  So you will be teaching your dog something about you, while all the neighbors think your nuts because you are talking to a dog…

However, will that be enough to make sure it does not happen again? Maybe. This will vary by age, breed, and relationship. Some dogs (and people) are so sensitive and in-tune to each other, that just this one act, ‘talking’ about the problem, is enough to keep it from happening again. This is the however, the exception, and not the rule. With a puppy you have to assume, that although they will understand there is some momentary displeasure in your relationship, the motivation to chew that thing up at the time (my gums are itchy), the anguish they feel at the loss your presence (will you ever come back to me), their need to eliminate the pressure in their bladder, is more powerful than some nebulous repercussions in the future. Recall that whole ‘living in the now” thing they are so good at, and that we could all probably learn from a little.

So what can you do, besides clean up the mess and talk to yourself?

Remember one very simple principal in dog training,

if there is something that is happening, that you don’t want it to happen, then you can’t let it happen.

Ok brilliant, thanks a lot. How do I do that? Brainstorm and think of a realistic solution for your individual situation.  Put the pup in her crate with a favorite chew toy, install a camera system in the home and monitor them (rush in to catch them in the act), leave them out in the yard when you are not home, confine them to the kitchen, never leave them alone, install baby gates, clean up everything they could possibly want to tear up, hire a pet sitter, take them with you, etc.  One of these, or none of these and something else,  will be the right answer for you and your dog.

Puppies outgrow many of these behaviors in time, as they mature. The problem is that each and every time they pup makes a bad choice, and get some sort of reward for it (my bladder is less uncomfortable, my teeth itch less, my frustration is less because I took it out on your notebook), they usually have to be faced with,  and choose NOT to repeat that same behavior, at least 10 TIMES to unlearn what they learned was a pleasant thing! Imagine that you got free candy from a vending machine one time. You are likely to try to again, probably a few times, to see if it you might get that lucky again. Your pup is the same way. So, if  something happens, that you don’t want it to, again,  see the one and only rule above. If you are still frustrated, hire a positive dog trainer. Simple as that, results guaranteed.

Without a complex spoken language to communicate with our animals, and a strong sense of living in the now,  we have to keep it as simple and black and white as possible. This makes the for the easiest, fastest, least expensive (no need to buy new shoes), safest (no chewed up electric wires), healthiest and most positive type of training one can do (think, no negative consequences because the bad thing does not happen again).

You have treated your beloved family member with kindness and respect, you have preserved, and even enhanced, the bond that you share, and, you have tapped into the best science has to offer about how animals learn and think, and you can rest assured there is no better, kinder, gentler, faster way to teach your loved one.  It really is, just that simple.

On that note, I am DrQ, and the rest, is up to you!

 

 

 

Animal lover’s: Let’s Revolutionize the World in 2 Minutes!

You ever wonder about how everyone, everywhere, quickly figured out the basics needed for keeping a pet? Seems even the most inexperienced would- be animal enthusiast, knows that the animal will need some kind of food and water every day, as well as a place to toilet.  The food will probably be whatever is easy on the wallet.  They purchase a few supplies, and look forward to a lifetime of smiling at that cute face! And from there, a person sets off on the average 10 year journey of pet guardianship. Hoping for the best, and dealing with pitfalls as they come, from illness and injury, to jumping and house-soiling. Sometimes seeking help along the way from the things that impact daily life in a little more seriously negative way, or just dealing with it.

For the person starting out, this is usually all there is to what goes into the preparation of having an animal for pet. If you are very lucky, and found a healthy little soul mate with a heart of gold, then you are going to be really happy you chose to have a pet! You get a great sense of fulfillment and happiness from all the years of selfless love and devotion you enjoy. But what if  you happen to fall in love with one that brings a little more gray hair, and frustration, on occasion? What if I told it never had to be that way, ever again? With one magical little tip, you can help teach your beloved how to transform into that “gosh darn best dog we ever had”, starting today! That’s right, it’s true!

So, here it it. My one magical tip that I am bursting to share with each and every pet parent, no matter their experience level, or even type of animal, this is what I wish each of you would do: spend 2 minutes a day, every single day, showing that animal something you would like them to do. Then reward them for it. Don’t ‘tell’ them to do something, ask them for a favor. Do it as faithfully as brushing your teeth, follow a couple of quick guidelines I have below, and you will be amazed at the profound transformation that will occur in only a few days! Your animal will love you for it! That’s it!

Let’s get this in perspective. All that worrying about the food, and the vaccines, and the type of toys to buy, should only be HALF of the time you spend in a day thinking about, and caring for your animals. The other half should be thinking about, what is my animal thinking about? And use that time to teaching the animal something neat to do, that makes your life even easier, more efficient, and more enjoyable.  Just 2 minutes a day, ask yourself, what is __________thinking right now, hm?” And ask for that favor, accordingly.

So don’t think of training as a big drudgery, or something someone is telling you that you should force on the animal.  Think of it as recces! Recess from your daily routine like dishes and laundry (a great excuse to do something super fun, and get to hang out with your best pal!), it only takes a few minutes (literally), and your animal gets to enjoy your undivided attention!

Ok, so what are the guidelines? Easy:

  1. Ask nice.
  2. Reward even more nicely for lessons well done.
  3. Ask 3 times for what you would like. If after that, they do not do it, or even try to do whatever it is. STOP! TAKE A DEEP BREATH. And then ask the easiest, most fun thing you both already know well, reward for it, and call it a day. Spend the rest of the 2 minutes cuddling. 🙂

Follow these easy steps,  in that order, and I personally guarantee you cannot fail to make great strides in the health, behavior, and the bond you share , than you ever even dared to dream possible. Yes, it is that easy! I dare you to do it for one week!

There you have it, all out in the open,  my biggest and most powerful health improving tip (for you and your animal) I can give you, is to spend just two minutes,  each day, playing with and teaching your animal something special to do. This instills in them a sense of accomplishment and pride and boosts their self confidence, as well as yours!

It does not have to be a fancy trick or a tough command. It can be as easy as don’t paw the treat out of my hand when I hand it to you. Let’s just work on being polite to each other. Treating each other with human decency and respect. It is not alright for our dogs to jump all over us, and our cats to claw us when they feel like it. It is not fair to us, or them. So let’s open people’s eyes to a whole new world of possibilities, where in every restaurant dogs are allowed, because the generally population of dogs are so well mannered. That less cats get re-homed because they get stressed out sometimes and pee on the floor. That no kids get hurt from fearful animals.

Let’s change the status quo about what is acceptable behavior for animals in society. Instead of the well mannered dog being the exception, they should be the rule, and then dogs could be allowed so much more freedom to bring them with us, they would enjoy it, and in turn be an even greater boost to the health of society at large! Image how just  2 minutes a day could revolutionize the entire world of animals in our society, in the pet industry, would help keep more animals out of shelters, and help more people to see the value of animals in our lives, as friends and partners in life. Won’t you join me, and let’s start a revolution, in just 2 minutes a day. Good luck!

I am DrQ, the rest, is up to you! Best wishes!

P.S. If would like more useful information like this on how to best care for animals, please like my Facebook page, and enjoy a personal invitation to join us at my new on-line university http://www.stealmoreyears.com Hope to ‘see’ you soon!