Posts tagged with "natural pet health care"

Questions about Vaccines? We have Answers!

This week on Facebook, someone posted pictures of their new kitten! Yeah! Soft fuzzy kitties! They had questions about where to go to find a veterinarian that shared their concerns about over vaccinating their beautiful new little baby.  Vaccines can be very confusing and down right scary depending on what you might read on the internet.

This week on our YouTube show the Treat Fairy, service dog trainer Neil Hutchins-Resto and I discuss some of the pros and cons of vaccines, vaccines schedules, and Cat Nip!

Hope you enjoy! If you find these videos helpful please subscribe to my YouTube channel The1DrQ.

Thanks so much, have a wonderful day!

 

Easy, Nutritious, and Delicious Pet Food Recipe’s!

These days more and more people are considering cooking for their pets.  Many have concerns over the quality of ingredients, contaminants and GMO’s, or worse  yet, toxins leading to pet food recalls. As my free gift to you Dog Food Recipe Bulgar Green Lentil Carrot Potatoe Celeryhere follows my easy recipe template that will guide you to cooking hundreds of recipes for dog and cat food! When you love your pet like family, if you care about what goes on your families plate, chances are, you care about what goes in your pet’s dish.  Most of my best clients cook for their pets, at least some, if not all of the time. It is easy to do, and easy to feel good about. It is often a lot cheaper too when you consider the high price needed for all that packaging, marketing, shipping, and distribution of your commercial pet food.

As always, discuss the recipe’s you want to cook and feed to your animal,  with your vet, before doing so. This should be a quick, easy, relatively painless conversation at your next yearly or semi-annual visit.  If your vet is discouraging, perhaps it is only because they are unaware of the health benefits. A good veterinarian will be open to the discussion,  willing to learn more, and address all your legitimate concerns. For example, here is a link to a study discussing adding fresh food to your dog’s diet, and it’s effects on cancer http://tiny.cc/ivkc7x.  This should come as no surprise to those of us that realize how much good nutrition is essential for good health.  Once you have your vet’s blessing  to try adding home cooked foods (generally not more than 25-50% at first, or additional supplements are needed such as egg shell calcium) to your pet’s nutritionally complete diet, then it is time to get creative, and have fun!

Keep in mind that all of these recipe’s can be equally fed to anything that will eat it; cats, dogs, people, and bearded dragons included.  It is pretty hilarious when the kids ask for a second helping of dog food!

The real simple base for any meal is:

1/3 veggies+

1/3 grain (rice, bulgur, millet, quinoa, etc.) +

1/3 legumes (red or green lentils, garbanzo beans, black beans, butter beans, etc. ) = nutritious and delicious!

Possible combinations include green lentils, bulgar, and sweet potatoes,   or black beans, rice, and carrots, and finally  millet, red lentils, and butternut squash.  The possibilities are limited only by your imagination and your pet’s pallet! The health benefits include absorbing all the bioflavonoid antioxidants (the bright colors in vegetables) as nature intended, before it was processed, put in a bag, and shipped in a truck. The diet includes lots of fiber which is excellent for digestive health recalling that 80% of the immune system is in the intestinal lining (if introduced slowly as directed should cause minimal gaseous discharge), and without having to be a chemist or a nutritionist, you will be most likely providing a complete protein, and well as nearly all the essential amino acids any animal needs.  You can add additional protein if you so desire (or not, and not worry about overdoing it), multiple types of fresh, preferably organic veggies known to be safe for pets, fresh milled golden flax seeds, or just about anything else that sounds healthy and nutritious, for you.

Here is today’s recipe:

In a saucepan, saute 1/2 cup chopped celery in a small amount water until translucent with one pinch of salt. Optional, add 1 TB Organic Olive Oil.Add 1 cup diced yellow unpeeled potatoes, 1 cup chopped organic unpeeled carrots, 1 cup rinsed bulgur wheat, 1 cup rinsed green lentils,  4-5 cups water, and simmer until root vegetables pierce easily with a fork. Done.  Serve warm spooned over commercial kibble, or serve in a dish sprinkled with nutritional yeast for extra vitamins, texture, and flavor. It’s as simple as that!

Quick, easy, delicious, cheap, and healthy. Your animals will love you even more for it! Use this guide to create your own homemade recipe ideas, and share  with us here or on Facebook or Instagram.  For specific questions about types of veggies to choose, what grains to choose for different conditions, or other questions you might have about cooking up your own pet food, please like and follow me on Facebook so that you will know when I am doing LIVE events on PetPeriscopeTV, or we can do a phone or email consultation through the website http://www.DrQandU.com. Stay tuned for more updates on our online courses via http://www.stealmoreyears.com,  where one of our 7 Secrets to Outwitting Your Pet’s Lifespan lessons will focus on diet and nutrition.

Looking forward to seeing what you have ‘cooked’ up! I’m DrQ, here to help you, take control of your health and that of your beloved animals!

Why Dog’s Bloat & How To Minimize the Risk

It’s just after dinnertime, and the doorbell rings. You suddenly have unexpected company, and your dog is excited as you are. It is at times like this it is of vital  importance to remember  one of the risks and dangers associated specifically with larger breed dogs, Gastric Dilitation Volvulus, or bloat, as it is commonly called.

Bloat is a condition where a dog’s stomach fills with gas and begins to twist out of place.  What you will see is vomiting or retching, with nothing coming up, and the dog’s stomach getting larger in size. The most frequent times this condition occurs is after the dog has eaten (and has a belly full of food and water), and then goes out through the dog door, or runs around and gets excited (such as with company), and all this activity causes the stomach to swing and slosh inside the dog, and eventually twist. Dog’s at highest risk are large and with a deep chest, like Rottweilers, Great Danes, German Shepherds, and similar.

An example of a deep chested dog at risk for bloat.

An example of a deep chested dog at risk for bloat.

If you suspect this has happened to your dog, they need to go to an emergency hospital, right away! Do not wait! If you notice the above signs, get your dog to the nearest vet as quickly as possible. There they can pass a tube into the stomach to relieve the gas build up, and/or possibly do surgery to correct the displacement and restore the blood flow cut off to vital parts of the stomach and intestines before it’s too late.  Bloat in dogs is always a potentially life threatening emergency.

Some people who adopt larger dogs, choose to have a surgical procedure called a “pexi” for short, performed,  which tacks the stomach to the inside wall of the chest so it cannot flip out of place (or at least greatly minimizes the chance of this happening). A great time to do this is in female dogs during their spay surgery. Ask your vet about it if you have a large, deep chested dog.

So how do we minimize the risk of bloat?

  1. Feed your dog smaller meals
  2. Keep your dog’s activity level to a minimum after eating

You can also:

  1. Consider a ‘pexi’ surgery for prevention
  2. Don’t allow your dog free access to the dog door after meals
  3. Feed a high quality, all natural diet. It might not specifically lower the risk for bloat, but it will help keep your dog healthier, for longer.

This is a disease process that can occur at any age, although it is most commonly noted in middle aged to older dogs. There is no direct genetic predisposition that has been confirmed. There are no specific geographic locations, or ambient temperatures which contribute to bloat occurring more often.   In high temperatures a panting dog is not necessarily at any higher risk, as they do not swallow air when panting. However, if the dog is frantic, and anxious because it is so hot, she may pace around trying to find relief from the heat, and after a meal, this could cause it to seem as if there is a link between high heat, panting, and bloat. The key is to always keep the dog quiet after eating, and not letting them drink a huge amount of water and then exercise.

That means when that unexpected company shows up right after dinner, be sure to FIRST put the dog in her crate, so she can remain calm and not accidentally jump around with excitement. In my experience, there has been a higher incidence of cases of bloat after the dog went out the dog door, and no one really noticed what activity the dog was doing for a short time.  I did the ‘pexi’ surgery on both my last two female dogs, during their spay surgeries.  Luckily I have not had to experience this horrific event with any of my dogs, and I wish the same for you.

On that note, I am DrQ, housecall veterinarian,  here to help you, in Denver, Colorado and around the world, to have the healthiest, longest relationship with your animals, than you ever thought possible. Thanks for reading! Please share if you found this helpful!

Other articles such as this can also be found on http://www.fetchpetcare.com.

 

Behavior and Training Class May 28th 2016 – Hope to See You!

What the Heck? Positive Punishment?

A More Practical Approach to Understanding the Science of Animal Behavior.

CE – 4 Hours Credit

Saturday, May 28thth, 2016  —  10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Jena Questen, DVM, CertAqV

Dr. Jena Questen of East West Vet, a veterinary practice providing balanced holistic and traditional care for dogs, cats, horses, llamas, and Koi fish, is a practitioner with a special interest in the science of animal behavior and training.

Location: Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology

Cost: $175.00, checks should be made out to Bel-Rea Institute

This class is for everyone! Guardians, technicians, animal trainers and would be trainers! If you LOVE interacting with animals, this class is for YOU!

No prerequisites although a basic understanding of behavior learning theory is helpful.

DrQ’s specialty in fish medicine has given her unique insight into the world of the training elite, marine mammal trainers. Learning more about the concepts of positive reinforcement, and how behavior impacts so many areas of an animal’s life, has ignited in her a passion to share the link to behavior and health to all animal lovers. She teaches and utilizes her knowledge and experience through free courses she offers via her animal rescue organization the Resqranch. This course is for anyone working with animals, including students, trainers, or just interested animal lovers. This course is an introduction to the science and terminology with the recent advances in our understanding of animal behavior and learning. However, the primary purpose is to give the student practical, hands-on applications for how to utilize this information in their day to day dealings with animals and their people.  This course is designed to help demystify training terminology, gives an easy to follow formula on how to train any animal, how to do almost anything, as well as practical tips and advice to keep people happy and safe with many kinds of animals in different situations.

Teaching at Purdue University.

Teaching at Purdue University.

Upon completion of this session, the student will have a good understanding of the meaning of positive and negative reinforcement, along with positive and negative punishment, and operant conditioning. Students will get an introduction to the concepts of LIMA, and marker training, and why it should be considered in any training program.  Students will also learn to appreciate the concept of how behavior is VITAL for good, long term health. What are the 7 most important areas of behavior, as related to maintaining health for multiple species of animals. Students will learn simplified, practical approaches to apply the science based concepts of behavior and training in everyday scenarios. There will be plenty of opportunity for case examples, questions, and an opportunity for hands on demonstrations with the horses on site.  

Complete the following and submit with payment (check or cash only) to Jennifer Hillgrove at Bel-Rea Institute, 1681 S. Dayton St. Denver, CO  80247.  Payment is non-refundable after Tuesday, May 19th,  2016, unless the class is cancelled.

LAST DAY to sign up for this CE is Thursday, May 19th 2016 at 12:00 noon.

Intrigued? Then sign up today, don’t delay! Looking forward to seeing you all there, it’s going to be a blast! 🙂

 

Your Positive Dog Business: Getting more!”

Thank you for taking good care of me!

Thank you for taking good care of me!

No matter if you own a positive (boarding, training, rescue, etc.) dog business, work for one, or dream of owning one in the future, join us for a chat time interview on the Facebook Group Positive Pet Advise on March 8th, 2015, 2 pm MST, with DrQ, Life Coach for People with Pets. Learn the perfect way to describe your business, and how to partner with your local vet, pet stores, and others, to help promote and grow your business.  This is for people who put their clients and their pets first,  realizing that the way to success, is through serving our clients with professionalism, compassion, and in the most authentic way possible, while striving to never stop learning.

2014 Wrap Up from the Resqranch

Hard to believe that we have now been living here at the Resqranch, for one whole year.  It is much easier time now, than it was then.  Moving in the middle of winter is no fun.  Thank goodness for my friend Ed who faithfully put in posts, and hung wire, to build fence, no matter how nasty and cold the weather.   Thank goodness for ALL the good people who helped us out, all year long.

Early in the year we lost Timba our  Toyger (a very rare breed) cat, to illness.  I am grateful we were able to give him a few more years of life after taking him in when he was slated for euthanasia.  Thank you Timba for beautiful pictures of our time with you, may you finally have peace.

In February we adopted a bearded dragon from the Foothills Animal Shelter. I learned what it is to know, appreciate, and fall in love with, a reptile, a creature so different on the outside, but so just like us all, needing love, on the inside.

Holiday 2014

Holiday 2014

And once settled in somewhat, with the spring, it was good to the horses and the donkey running free, and realizing that perhaps yes we moved out of one dream, but that we moved into a bigger one. I would choose my animals over a house, again, any day.  And then, I was featured on the front page of the Denver Post, right next to President Obama.

The height of the summer was marked by the American Veterinary Medical Association convention, where I was entrusted by my colleagues to help teach other veterinarians about fish medicine.  And where I was then able to rescue all the surviving koi and goldfish from the hands on ‘wet’ lab (who would often be euthanize afterwards).  And yes those Petsmart fish are much loved and doing great!

In September I was supremely honored to speak at the International Symposium on Aquatic Animal Health, which only happens once every 4 years, in Portland, Oregon.  I never dared to dream that big.

Then later in the fall I achieved something even bigger, by becoming the 21st person in the world to achieve the CertAqV designation for my dedication to the pursuit of aquatic animal medicine. Thank you to all who supported me, a most unlikely person to become a fish doctor!

Finally I began my writing career in earnest, and have been blogging on my website with purpose. It is a work in progress, but imperfect action is better than no action.  It is tough sometimes to stick to your own self inflicted task list.  You have to possess unyielding resolve, and a hardy dose of faith, to see and believe in the bigger picture, even when many others around you, do not.

I am thankful every day for my Mother, the most amazing person I have ever known, for being there for me every step of the way, moving boxes, washing kids laundry, making cat food, studying business with me,  and helping me apply what we learn.  For being there tirelessly cheering me on, and having blind faith in me, no matter how ridiculously out of reach some goals may seem.  Thank you.

I have no idea if I will have the same level of opportunities in 2015, but I do know I have much to be grateful for at the start of this new year.  Thanks to the Prince of Flame Charity Fund we are in the process of putting up a barn for the animals, and I am looking forward to planning a Resqranch open house and volunteer orientation in the spring.  I am excited about how we will be able to teach people so that we may fulfill our vision of decreasing insurance, shelter,  animal injuries and costs, while strengthening the bond between animals and the people who love them.  Thank you for reading and being a part of the story.  Here is to optimism for the people, the animals, and the planet in 2015.  May we all find the shortest path to more love in the world, every day.

 

 

 

My video is in the top 20 for 2012!

I am so excited to share with you that I was just advised that I have a top-performing video on eHow.com from 2012!

After gathering their top performers from the past year, my video Natural Way to Feed a Cat ranked in the Top 20 of all published videos. Considering they published thousands of videos in 2012, this is quite an accomplishment. In fact, my video totaled over 20,000 page views!

I could not be more please that I was able to share good information about natural health care for cats.  Hopefully my suggestions will help some kitties out there live happier and healthier, longer.

Please feel free to share or re-post if you find the information useful, too!

Until next time,

DrQ

 
http://cdn-i.dmdentertainment.com/DMVideoPlayer/player.swf
Natural Way to Feed a Cat —powered by eHow.com

How to identify a poisonous coral snake from a harmless king or milk snake

In this video I explain how to tell the difference in the color bands on the two types of snakes. Remember:  black and red, friend of Jack,black and yellow, kill a fellow. So what you’re looking for to identify the dangerous snake is to see if the yellow and black bands actually touch each other. That is how to tell the difference between the two types of snakes.
http://cdn-i.dmdentertainment.com/DMVideoPlayer/player.swf
How to Tell the Difference Between a Poisonous Coral Snake & a Non-Poisonous King Snake —powered by eHow.com

New packages starting next year!

Dr Questen With a bunch of animalsStay tuned to this website and your email for changes coming to the practice next year. We will be offering monthly packages in order to better help with your budget, as well as to provide even better preventive care to help prolong the life of your beloved cat, dog, horse, or fish.
We would would really appreciate any comments, concerns, or questions. Your input is very valuable to us and all thoughts and comments will be taken into consideration.
Help us to be better able to serve you and your pets needs in the coming new year with the most cost effective preventive medicine plan we can offer.
Leave your comments, today. Prevention is, after all, the best medicine!

DrQ and U at the Races this Saturday August 11th!

Hi all, I am excited and getting ready for our big horse race track charity event this Saturday, hope you are too! For those who want the back side tour we will me at the stable gate a few minutes before 11 am. Then head to the grandstand for a quick lesson on the in’s and out’s of racing, then we can head back to the barn and escort a nice stallion to his race that I am sponsoring at 3:30, which if he wins we will be in the winners circle with him for his picture! Email or call the office directly for more details. Looking forward to seeing you all there! DrQ and Prince of Flame